Text 28 Jul 64 notes

Anonymous said: You're a disgusting propagandist for Hamas.

priceofliberty:

social-darwin-awards:

priceofliberty:

freexcitizen:

meownarchy:

for-chips-and-for-freedom:

meownarchy:

I don’t support Hamas. I don’t support governments or oppressive regimes. That’s kinda the whole point of you know, being an anarchist. I can criticize the Israeli government and army without being a supporter of Hamas. I’m really sorry that your brain is so controlled by dichotomies and black/white morality that you’re incapable of seeing more than two sides to a situation.

I wasn’t the one who sent the anon ask, but I just wanna say that it seems like anarchy is a cop-out. It’s far easier to say “this problem wouldn’t have existed without government”, and then continue to sit around doing nothing, than to actually think of ways to solve the problem.

I don’t have constructive ideas either, but at least I don’t pretend to be above the system while actually being useless.

This goes for most of what anarchists contribute to political discussions.

I’m not saying that this problem wouldn’t exist without government. I never said anything like that, I’m just saying I can’t support any group that seeks to control the people in that region. The conflict is primarily between groups seeking political power, like most militaristic conflicts.

I never said I was above any system, those are just my personal morals. I got a little snippy near the end, but I’m sick of anons calling me disgusting names and claiming I’m a supporter of Hamas and all this other stuff I get in my ask about it.

Also, I highly doubt a college student in El Paso could feasibly solve a conflict that’s been going on this long. You say cop-out as if it’s my responsibility to solve foreign affairs.

"ANARCHISTS HAVE TO COME UP WITH PERFECT SOLUTIONS TO THE WORLDS PROBLEMS OR ITS A COP OUT/ANARCHY DOESNT WORK" yeah but how come you don’t hold the government to the same standards?

Governments are rarely ever held accountable by the same standards as individuals.

And they shouldn’t be. Just like corporations aren’t people either.

Let me make a correction: Governments and their agents are rarely ever held accountable by the same standards as individuals.

It depends on whether they’re acting as government agents or citizens, the former gets into the age-old, done-to-death ‘cops can break the law’ debate, the latter is merely corruption.

I will say, though, that police are in some aspects intended to be held to stricter standards, like filming them.

Text 28 Jul 64 notes

Anonymous said: You're a disgusting propagandist for Hamas.

priceofliberty:

freexcitizen:

meownarchy:

for-chips-and-for-freedom:

meownarchy:

I don’t support Hamas. I don’t support governments or oppressive regimes. That’s kinda the whole point of you know, being an anarchist. I can criticize the Israeli government and army without being a supporter of Hamas. I’m really sorry that your brain is so controlled by dichotomies and black/white morality that you’re incapable of seeing more than two sides to a situation.

I wasn’t the one who sent the anon ask, but I just wanna say that it seems like anarchy is a cop-out. It’s far easier to say “this problem wouldn’t have existed without government”, and then continue to sit around doing nothing, than to actually think of ways to solve the problem.

I don’t have constructive ideas either, but at least I don’t pretend to be above the system while actually being useless.

This goes for most of what anarchists contribute to political discussions.

I’m not saying that this problem wouldn’t exist without government. I never said anything like that, I’m just saying I can’t support any group that seeks to control the people in that region. The conflict is primarily between groups seeking political power, like most militaristic conflicts.

I never said I was above any system, those are just my personal morals. I got a little snippy near the end, but I’m sick of anons calling me disgusting names and claiming I’m a supporter of Hamas and all this other stuff I get in my ask about it.

Also, I highly doubt a college student in El Paso could feasibly solve a conflict that’s been going on this long. You say cop-out as if it’s my responsibility to solve foreign affairs.

"ANARCHISTS HAVE TO COME UP WITH PERFECT SOLUTIONS TO THE WORLDS PROBLEMS OR ITS A COP OUT/ANARCHY DOESNT WORK" yeah but how come you don’t hold the government to the same standards?

Governments are rarely ever held accountable by the same standards as individuals.

And they shouldn’t be. Just like corporations aren’t people either.

Photo 28 Jul 2,481 notes ragemovement:

An Indiana police officer has kept his job after pushing over a man in a wheelchair – despite his entire department demanding he be fired.
Lafayette Police Department Lieutenant Tom Davidson can be seen on video, dated October 1st last year, shoving paraplegic Nicholas Kincade.
The assault appears to be prompted by Mr Kincade bumping Lt Davidson’s foot with his motorised wheelchair.
The incident occurred near the Excel School in Indianapolis, where police were called by school staff after Mr Kincade allegedly told them he had a gun in his backpack. Responding officers quickly found the man didn’t have a gun and he was told that he could leave with a trespassing warning, at the school’s request. According to Turnto23, Lt Davidson was put on leave during an investigation into his actions, but despite his department saying that he should be fired, the Lafayette Police Civil Service Commision – who vote on hiring and firing officers – instead ruled ‘unbecoming conduct’ and sentenced him to a 30-day unpaid suspension and a drop in rank. http://metro.co.uk/2014/07/05/police-officer-pushes-over-man-in-wheelchair-doesnt-get-fired-4787679/

ragemovement:

An Indiana police officer has kept his job after pushing over a man in a wheelchair – despite his entire department demanding he be fired.

Lafayette Police Department Lieutenant Tom Davidson can be seen on video, dated October 1st last year, shoving paraplegic Nicholas Kincade.

The assault appears to be prompted by Mr Kincade bumping Lt Davidson’s foot with his motorised wheelchair.

The incident occurred near the Excel School in Indianapolis, where police were called by school staff after Mr Kincade allegedly told them he had a gun in his backpack. Responding officers quickly found the man didn’t have a gun and he was told that he could leave with a trespassing warning, at the school’s request. According to Turnto23, Lt Davidson was put on leave during an investigation into his actions, but despite his department saying that he should be fired, the Lafayette Police Civil Service Commision – who vote on hiring and firing officers – instead ruled ‘unbecoming conduct’ and sentenced him to a 30-day unpaid suspension and a drop in rank. http://metro.co.uk/2014/07/05/police-officer-pushes-over-man-in-wheelchair-doesnt-get-fired-4787679/

(Source: kropotkindersurprise)

Text 28 Jul 4 notes STOP USING SKYPE +++++++++++++++++
Every e-mail account hosted in our servers gives access to our XMPP
instant messaging network (Jabber). We are glad to suggest you an instant
messaging and videoconference service that is not based on software or
servers owned by big corporations.

There are IM clients like Jitsi which can be configured for your Jabber
account and that can also be used for videoconferencing. Such clients also
include OTR for encrypting written chat messages.

PLEASE NOTE that by default Jitsi keeps every log and you need to check
all settings carefully.

You can find information on our Jabber service here:
http://www.autistici.org/en/services/chat.html

Currently we don't have a howto for Jitsi in our website: if you use this
client and write a howto for it, we will be eternally grateful for
your effort!

~Autistici newsletter 12/2013
Link 28 Jul 13 notes Ford and General Motors Sued Over 'CD Ripping Cars'»

priceofliberty:

A quarter century ago the music industry was confronted with a new threat – cassette tape recorders.

These devices were able to make “near perfect” copies of any audio recording and the RIAA and others feared this would be the end of the recorded music industry.

The record labels took their fears to Congress, which eventually resulted in the Audio Home Recording Act (AHRA) of 1992. Under this law importers and manufacturers have to pay royalties on “digital audio recording devices,” among other things.

The legislation also applies to some newer recording devices common today, which is now causing trouble for Ford and General Motors. Both companies ship cars with the ability to rip CDs onto internal hard drives and according to a coalition of artists and record companies this violates copyright law.

The Alliance of Artists and Recording Companies (AARC), which lists major record labels and 300,000 artists among its members, filed a class action lawsuit on Friday in which they demand millions of dollars in compensation.

TorrentFreak obtained a copy of the complaint (pdf) which states that Ford’s “Jukebox” device and General Motor’s “Hard Drive Device” allow consumers to rip CDs onto an internal hard drive. According to the music group these devices fall under the Audio Home Recording Act and the car companies are therefore required to pay royalties.

Thus far, neither Ford nor General Motors has complied with any requirements of the Act. Both companies have sold cars with these devices for several years on a variety of models including the Lincoln MKS, Ford Taurus, Ford Explorer, Buick LaCrosse, Cadillac SRX, Chevrolet Volt, and GMC Terrain.

In addition to the two car companies, the lawsuit also targets their technology partners Denso and Clarion. Commenting on the dispute the AARC notes that a class action lawsuit was unavoidable.

“Twenty-two years ago, cooperation between music creators and device manufacturers resulted in legislation that led to a digital electronics revolution. But having reaped the benefits of this bargain, Ford, GM, Denso, and Clarion have now decided to ignore their obligations to music creators and declare themselves above the law,” AARC Executive Director Linda Bocchi comments

“While no one likes litigation, Ford, GM, Denso, and Clarion have stonewalled long enough, and we are determined to collect the royalties our members – and all artists and music creators with rights under the AHRA – are owed,” Bocchi adds.

The artists and record labels are looking for both actual and statutory damages, which could amount to hundreds of millions of dollars. In addition, they want to prevent the manufacturers from selling these unauthorized devices in their cars.

The case will prove to be an interesting test of the legality of “recording” devices in car entertainment systems. As is usually true, the law is not as black and white as AARC’s complaint states.

For example, the lawsuit doesn’t mention that the Audio Home Recording Act includes various exemptions for personal use and for recording equipment that’s part of a larger device, such as CD-burners in computers.

It’s now up to the court to decide how cars fit into this picture.

Text 28 Jul 8 notes

I would really prefer if people who supported Palestine were not simultaneously anti-Semitic.

Photo 28 Jul 5,372 notes standwithpalestine:

Do you remember how big a deal it was in the media when Israel accused Hamas of this? 
Do you see how the information that Hamas weren’t behind it is not being covered by the media?
Over 1,000 dead in Gaza. This was another genocidal Zionist lie.

standwithpalestine:

Do you remember how big a deal it was in the media when Israel accused Hamas of this? 

Do you see how the information that Hamas weren’t behind it is not being covered by the media?

Over 1,000 dead in Gaza. This was another genocidal Zionist lie.

Photo 28 Jul 1,909 notes ourtimeorg:

Good point, Stephen.

ourtimeorg:

Good point, Stephen.

Video 28 Jul 11,915 notes

deadtate:

 

iammyfather:

anarcho-queer:

Study Reveals It Costs Much Less to House The Homeless Than to Leave Them on the Street

Not only is it morally wrong to let people live desperately on the streets, but it doesn’t make much economical sense either.

A new study has found that it’s significantly cheaper to house the homeless than leave them on the streets.

University of North Carolina Charlotte researchers released a study on Monday that tracked chronically homeless adults housed in the Moore Place facility run by Charlotte’s Urban Ministry Center (UMC) in partnership with local government. Housing these people led to dramatic cost savings that more than paid for the cost of putting them in decent housing, including $1.8 million in health care savings from 447 fewer ER visits (78% reduction) and 372 fewer hospital days (79% reduction). Tenants also spent 84 fewer days in jail, with a 72% drop in arrests.

Moore Place cost $6 million in land and construction costs, and tenants are required to contribute 30% of their income (mainly benefits) towards rent. The remainder of the $14,000 per tenant annually is covered by donations and local and federal funding. According to the UNCC study, that $14,000 pales in comparison to the costs a chronically homeless person racks up every year to society — a stunning $39,458 in combined medical, judicial and other costs.

What’s more, Moore Place is enabling the formerly homeless to find their own sources of income. Without housing, just 50% were able to generate any income. One year after move-in, they’re up to 82%. And after an average length of 7 years of homelessness, 94% of the original tenants retained their housing after 18 months, with a 99% rent collection rate.

The general population is biased: The original proposal for Moore Place was “controversial, if not ridiculed,” according to the Charlotte Observer. Locals mocked the idea that giving the homeless subsidized housing would do any good. A 2011 report commissioned by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority found that people have condescending attitudes towards the homeless, with the public perceiving higher levels of substance abuse problems (91%) and mental health issues (85%) than reported by the homeless themselves (41% and 24% respectively). It concluded that if “personal failings as the main cause of homelessness, it is unlikely that they will vote for increased public assistance or volunteer to help the homeless themselves.

But “you can’t argue with the statistics," said UMC housing director Caroline Chambre. “This approach was controversial at one time because of the stereotype of who the homeless are, and we had to change that stereotype.

In 2012, total welfare spending for the poor was just 0.47% of the federal budget. It turns out that maybe if we spent a little more to help the chronically destitute solve their problems, we could save a lot of money.

Hey Capitalists, supply and demand means that with 5 times as many empty homes as homeless people, you should be paying them to move in

Hmmm…

Video 28 Jul 24,619 notes

Bruce Davidson - Time of Change: Civil Rights Photographs, 1961-1965 (via)

(Source: vintagegal)

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